Our programs

SUSTAINED ENGAGEMENTS

NIGER BASIN

Context

  • Year started: 2015
  • Key Partner/s: Niger Basin Authority (NBA)

The Niger Basin covers nine countries – Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Mali, Niger, and Nigeria – and is one of the world’s poorest regions. The population in the basin is highly vulnerable, with 70% of its 130 million inhabitants living in rural areas amidst food insecurity due to extreme climate and rainfall variability.

Objective and Program Elements

The Niger River Basin Project has strengthened the institutional framework for regional cooperation by building the institutional and organizational systems of the NBA through institutional analysis and a participatory self-assessment exercise. The project developed the Niger River Inner Delta model to understand how services provided by this wetland’s ecosystems respond to different inflow patterns.

The CIWA-financed Niger Basin Climate Resilience Investment Plan (CRIP), developed by the Niger Basin countries, has mobilized and coordinated investments in climate resilience. CIWA has worked directly with a few countries in the basin to enable a stronger understanding of national dependence on the shared river, and show how national investments can have regional benefits.

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NILE BASIN

Context

  • Year started: 2012
  • Key Partner/s: Nile Basin Initiative (NBI), Nile Basin Discourse (NBD)

CIWA supports the Nile Basin Initiative (NBI), an intergovernmental partnership of ten Nile Basin countries. These countries include Burundi, DR Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, The Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Objective and Program Elements

Nile Cooperation for Results Project (NCORE) supports the NBI to prepare multi-stream and cooperative regional investments that include a pipeline of US$ 6 billion in investments being advanced by Nile countries.

The NBI continues the first phase implementation of a basin-wide hydromet network with over 50 hydrological monitoring stations to be rehabilitated, installed and commissioned by 2021. Flood forecasting and an early warning system have produced forecast reports regularly for Lake Tana Floodplains, Blue and Main Nile System (Sudan) and Baro Akobo Sobat floodplains in Gambella.

NCORE has supported the development of dam safety guidelines and national dam safety departments in Ethiopia, Sudan, and South Sudan. Its internship and young professionals’ programs are enhancing national capacity by creating a knowledge community to support the shared understanding of the resource base. Complemented by the Nile Basin Discourse, NBI projects amplify the voice of grassroots communities in development projects.

The NBI regional investment portfolio in the Nile Basin is expected to benefit over eight million people through improved watershed management, irrigation, electricity production, and water supply.

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VOLTA BASIN

Context

  • Year started: 2015
  • Key Partner/s: Volta Basin Authority (VBA)

The basin spreads over six riparian West African countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Mali, Togo, and Ghana. The total basin population is around 14 million.

Objective and Program Elements

The Volta River Basin assisted in improving the capacity of the Volta Basin Authority (VBA) on transboundary water resources management.

The Council of Ministers endorsed the Volta Water Charter in May 2019. In doing so, CIWA trained 180 civil society organizations (30 per country) involved in climate resilience and the environment, bringing together key strategic partners from the six countries.

CIWA supported VBA by sharing studies and knowledge products ranging from regional planning documents to technical studies on water resources, climate risks through an improved website and international workshops.

The project helped finalize VBA’s Communications Strategy and Plan by consulting 500 stakeholders, including civil society organizations representing women’s interests. The implementation has helped increase local stakeholder awareness through the community and rural radio outreach.

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ZAMBEZI BASIN

Context

  • Year started: 2014
  • Key Partner/s: Zambezi Watercourse Commission (ZAMCOM) and Zambezi River Authority (ZRA)

CIWA supports projects across eight riparian states of Angola, Namibia, Zambia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Tanzania, and Mozambique within the Zambezi River Basin.

Objective and Program Elements

CIWA has helped improve cooperative management and development in the basin.

The Zambezi River Basin Management Project supported strategic basin planning, decision support systems and institutional strengthening activities. The project has enabled Zambezi Watercourse Commission (ZAMCOM) with data and decision-making tools and policy options to implement and advance transboundary water resources development and management.

ZAMCOM developed the Zambezi Water Resources Information System (ZAMWIS) with CIWA’s support. ZAMWIS is a database, planning tool, and flow forecasting system to support climate monitoring and climate-sensitive planning in the basin to mitigate the impact of water shocks with operational collaboration among riparian states.

The Zambezi River Basin Development Project supported the infrastructure development, such as conducting detailed feasibility, environmental and social studies and transaction advisory services for the Batoka Gorge hydropower project.

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STRATEGIC ENGAGEMENTS

HORN OF AFRICA

Context

  • Year started: 2019
  • Key Partner/s: Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), covering Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, and Uganda.

Objective and Program Elements

CIWA supports the Horn of Africa Groundwater Initiative by consolidating and improving access to groundwater data, institutional capacity building, and feasibility studies for economically exploitable groundwater resources in three transboundary aquifers prioritized by the IGAD member countries.

The Knowledge initiative – Strengthening Climate Resilience focuses on pastoral communities, a vital group in the national and regional economies of the Horn of Africa, which is highly vulnerable to climate change. The analytical work is strengthening the information base and institutions by building a shared understanding of the benefits and potential trade-offs of inter-dependencies and regional actions from a resilience lens for regional cooperation, and scope potential investments. It will explore specific regional investment opportunities across multiple sectors and invest in improved data and cooperation platforms or events.

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SOMALIA

Context

  • Year started: 2018
  • Key Partner/s: Government of Somalia

Somalia has the longest coastline on Africa’s mainland. It has an estimated population of around 15 million.

Objective and Program Elements

The Somali Transboundary Water Resources Management project provides technical support to the Government of Somalia to articulate its water resources development options for the Juba and Shebelle basins.

The project builds the capacity of the Somalian Government, particularly the Ministry of Energy and Water Resources. It is supporting the development of a water resources model and a National Water Strategy.

The project has helped the Government pursue dialogue with neighbouring countries by establishing a multi-agency transboundary team under the President’s Office to provide a coordinated approach.

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LAKE CHAD

Context

  • Year started: 2013
  • Key Partner/s: Lake Chad Basin Commission (LCBC), multiple Water Resources Management (WRM) organizations

Lake Chad is economically significant, providing water to more than 30 million people living in the four countries surrounding it: Chad, Cameroon, Niger, and Nigeria. The Sahel is one of the poorest regions of the world. The largest river basins of the region (including the Niger, Senegal and the Volta) are shared by some countries, including those that are not in the Sahel eco-climatic zones (such as Code d’Ivoire, Ghana and Guinea).

Objective and Program Elements

The Lake Chad Dialogue project supported the development of an updated basin-wide conceptual groundwater model by assessing old and new information and reflecting on the current understanding of the basin.

A preliminary numerical groundwater modelling has been done and provided recommendations for future modelling efforts. The project also supported the development of the Lake Chad Basin Development and Climate Resilience Action Plan. It enhanced the capacity of the Lake Chad Basin Commission on data collection, sharing information, and carrying out analysis useful to the governance of the basin’s shared natural resources.

A new Improving Water Resources Management in West and Central Sahel Technical Assistance Project, is a knowledge initiative that intends to contribute to improved water resources management through selected engagements in the basins and countries of the Sahel. It will support country-level efforts to compile and analyze the available information on the status of WRM, identifying critical gaps and necessary measures. Through global knowledge partnerships, CIWA is facilitating the adoption of new and better technologies and approaches for improving the cooperative management of water resources.

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WEST AND CENTRAL SAHEL 

Context

  • Year started: 2019
  • Key Partner/s: Multiple Water Resources Management (WRM) organizations

The Sahel is one of the poorest regions of the world. The largest river basins of the region (including the Niger, Senegal, and the Volta) are shared by countries, including those that are not in the Sahel eco-climatic zones (such as Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, and Guinea).

Objective and Program Elements 

The newly approved Bank – executed Improving Water Resources Management in West and Central Sahel Technical Assistance Project is designed to Strengthen water resources management in the region by identifying pragmatic investments and policy actions. The project will address the critical knowledge and capacity gaps in knowledge management, gender empowerment, climate change, and addressing challenges related to fragility, conflict and violence.

It will support a dialogue with the G5 Sahel countries, to develop a pragmatic approach and engagement options for supporting the region in the sustainable management and mobilization of transboundary water resources, as a necessary foundation for broader socio-economic development.

It supports country-level efforts in Ghana, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, and Cote d’Ivoire to compile and analyze the available information on the status of WRM, identifying critical gaps and necessary measures. Through global knowledge partnerships, CIWA is facilitating the adoption of new and better technologies and approaches for improving the cooperative management of water resources. 

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GREAT LAKES WATER QUALITY 

Context

  • Year Started: 2020
  • Key Partner/s: Nile Basin Initiative (NBI), NELSAP (Nile Equatorial Lakes Strategic Action Program) and ENTRO (Eastern Nile Technical Regional Office)

In the Great Lakes region of East Africa, improving lake management for water quality is required for food security, resilient livelihoods, human capital, and stability. This region is strategically vital due to its high population density due to high soil fertility, wetter climate, particularly at Lake Victoria. These fisheries are a haven for those lacking other resources.

Objective and Program Elements

This new knowledge initiative aims to advance the water-quality knowledge base that will underpin investments to improve stability, human capital, and climate resilience in the Great Lakes region. 

The project employs a phased approach to unpack this complicated problem. In FY 20, a rapid diagnostics phase has defined the region’s characteristics and challenges. This phase analyzed water pollution drivers and how they intersect with fragility, human capital, and climate resilience using advanced economic modelling and cutting edge remotely sensed data. 

Based on analyses in the first phase, priority sub-basin locations have been selected for further focused analytical and technical assistance, in collaboration with the NBI. 

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LUAPULA RIVER BASIN

Context

  • Year Started: 2017
  • Key Partner/s: Government of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Government of Zambia

The Luapula River is a section of the River Congo, Africa’s second-longest river. It is a transboundary river that forms part of the border between Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).  

Objective and Program Elements

The project team conducted a desk review of the legal and institutional frameworks to inform the future development of Luapula Sub-Basin hydropower investments in Zambia and the DRC.  The review analyzed the current institutional arrangements, existing laws, and proposed options to strengthen the institutional framework for cooperation in the Luapula River basin, including on aspects related to the development of Luapula Hydropower Projects.

Around US$ 1.5 billion investments are planned across three shared priority sites of the Luapula River with a total installed cumulative capacity of 790 MW.

The two countries have discussed the possibility to establish the Luapula River Authority (LRA) to manage the shared water resources.

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THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY (SADC)

Context

  • Year started: 2014
  • Key Partner/s: SADC-Groundwater Management Institute (GMI)

The Southern African Development Community (SADC) is an inter-governmental organization strengthening cooperation among 16 Southern African countries. SADC faces severe climatic variability scenarios, and it’s population suffer from varying degrees of water scarcity.

Objective and Program Elements

As a Centre of Excellence, SADC-GMI works with River Basin Organizations (RBOs) in strengthening their institutional capacity and collaborates with other network institutions on advancing knowledge on transboundary and national groundwater.

Through the Sustainable Groundwater Management in SADC Project, co-financed by CIWA and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), a SADC-wide framework for groundwater data collection and management has been produced. Joint activities promoting transboundary aquifer management have been implemented with partners. Pilot projects on groundwater monitoring networks, sand dams, shallow aquifers recharge and exploration, among others, are being planned.

A new knowledge and analytical Southern Africa Drought Resilience Program provides technical support to help SADC member states better manage risks emanating from drought across the energy-water-food environment nexus. CIWA will provide technical assistance and analytics along the three pillars: Cities, Energy Systems, Livelihoods and Food Security. The project will fill knowledge gaps, advise counterparts on drought risk management strategies and approaches, and incorporate a transboundary method by tackling more than one country or producing outputs that can be used or replicated in other countries across the region. 

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CATALYTIC PROGRAM

DISRUPTIVE DIGITAL DATA

The nature of the current global technology and data revolution has created the potential for scaling up some of CIWA’s information related support across the region. The Digital Data Initiative will help countries, regional organizations in data collection, data management, analysis and interpretation using specific applications such as water accounting. The analysis-ready information system for decision-makers improves evidence-based decisions on water resources.

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